Housing Environment - Substandard Housing

This indicator reports the number and percentage of owner- and renter-occupied housing units having at least one of the following conditions: 1) lacking complete plumbing facilities, 2) lacking complete kitchen facilities, 3) with 1.01 or more occupants per room, 4) selected monthly owner costs as a percentage of household income greater than 30 percent, and 5) gross rent as a percentage of household income greater than 30 percent. Selected conditions provide information in assessing the quality of the housing inventory and its occupants. This data is used to easily identify homes where the quality of living and housing can be considered substandard.
Report Area Total Occupied Housing Units Occupied Housing Units with One or More Substandard Conditions Percent Occupied Housing Units with One or More Substandard Conditions
Franklin County, PA 58,298 16,451 28.22%
Pennsylvania 4,957,736 1,557,383 31.41%
United States 116,211,088 41,333,888 35.57%
Note: This Indicator is compared with the state average. Green - Better than state average, Red - Worse than state average.
Data Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey. 2010-14. Source geography: Tract

Substandard Housing: Number of Substandard Conditions Present
Report Area No Conditions One Condition Two or Three Conditions Four Conditions
Franklin County, PA 71.78% 27.25% 0.97% 0%
Pennsylvania 68.59% 30.22% 1.18% 0.01%
United States 64.43% 33.44% 2.12% 0.01%
Substandard Housing: Households Lacking Complete Plumbing Facilities
Complete plumbing facilities include: (a) hot and cold running water, (b) a flush toilet, and (c) a bathtub or shower. All three facilities must be located inside the house, apartment, or mobile home, but not necessarily in the same room. Housing units are classified as lacking complete plumbing facilities when any of the three facilities is not present.
Report Area Total Occupied Housing Units Housing Units Lacking Complete Plumbing Facilities Housing Units Lacking Complete Plumbing Facilities, Percent
Franklin County, PA 58,298 217 0.37%
Pennsylvania 4,957,736 21,574 0.44%
United States 116,211,088 537,459 0.46%
Substandard Housing: Households Lacking Complete Kitchen Facilities
A unit has complete kitchen facilities when it has all three of the following facilities: (a) a sink with a faucet, (b) a stove or range, and (c) a refrigerator. All kitchen facilities must be located in the house, apartment, or mobile home, but they need not be in the same room. A housing unit having only a microwave or portable heating equipment such as a hot plate or camping stove should not be considered as having complete kitchen facilities. An icebox is not considered to be a refrigerator.
Report Area Total Occupied Housing Units Housing Units Lacking Complete Kitchen Facilities Housing Units Lacking Complete Kitchen Facilities, Percent
Franklin County, PA 63,779 1,686 2.64%
Pennsylvania 5,578,393 192,079 3.44%
United States 132,741,032 3,966,466 2.99%
Substandard Housing: Households Lacking Telephone Service
A telephone must be in working order and service available in the house, apartment, or mobile home that allows the respondent to both make and receive calls. Households that have cell-phones (no land-line) are counted as having telephone service available. Households whose service has been discontinued for nonpayment or other reasons are not counted as having telephone service available.
Report Area Total Housing Units Lacking Telephone Service Total Housing Units Lacking Telephone Service Owner-Occupied Units Lacking Telephone Service Owner-Occupied Units Lacking Telephone Service Renter-Occupied Units Lacking Telephone Service Renter-Occupied Units Lacking Telephone Service
Franklin County, PA 930 1.6% 409 .97% 521 3.26%
Pennsylvania 98,608 1.99% 40,952 1.19% 57,656 3.81%
United States 2,875,544 2.47% 1,157,901 1.55% 1,717,643 4.15%
Website Updated August 2016

Housing Environment - Substandard Housing

Data Background

The American Community Survey (ACS) is a nationwide, continuous survey designed to provide communities with reliable and timely demographic, housing, social, and economic data. The ACS samples nearly 3 million addresses each year, resulting in nearly 2 million final interviews. The ACS replaces the long-form decennial census; however, the number of household surveys reported annually for the ACS is significantly less than the number reported in the long-form decennial census. As a result, the ACS combines detailed population and housing data from multiple years to produce reliable estimates for small counties, neighborhoods, and other local areas. Negotiating between timeliness and accuracy, the ACS annually releases current, one-year estimates for geographic areas with large populations; three-year and five-year estimates are also released each year for additional areas based on minimum population thresholds.

Citation: U.S. Census Bureau: A Compass for Understanding and Using American Community Survey Data (2008).

For more information about this source, including data collection methodology and definitions, refer to the American Community Survey website.

Methodology

Counts of housing units by age and condition are acquired from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Data represent estimates for the 5 year period 2008-2012. Mapped data are summarized to 2010 census tract boundaries. Area estimates are developed at the U.S. Census Bureau, and given as a value for each geographic area. Raw counts are not provided, inhibiting the ability to produce median ages for report areas.

For more information on the data reported in the American Community Survey, please see the complete American Community Survey 2012 Subject Definitions.

Courtesy: Community Commons, <www.communitycommons.org>, August 2016