Urban and Rural Population

This indicator reports the percentage of population living in urban and rural areas. Urban areas are identified using population density, count, and size thresholds. Urban areas also include territory with a high degree of impervious surface (development). Rural areas are all areas that are not urban.
Report Area Total Population Urban Population Rural Population Percent Urban Percent Rural
Franklin County, PA 149,618 89,244 60,374 59.65% 40.35%
Pennsylvania 12,702,379 9,991,287 2,711,092 78.66% 21.34%
United States 312,471,327 252,746,527 59,724,800 80.89% 19.11%
Data Source: US Census Bureau, Decennial Census. 2010. Source geography: Tract

Rural Population, Total by Age Group
Report Area Population Under Age 18 Population Age 18-64 Population Age 65+
Franklin County, PA 15,179 36,310 8,885
Pennsylvania 599,639 1,670,861 440,592
United States 13,907,394 36,734,957 9,082,449
Rural Population, Percent by Age Group
Report Area Population Under Age 18 Population Age 18-64 Population Age 65+
Franklin County, PA 42.47% 40.71% 36.00%
Pennsylvania 21.48% 21.01% 22.49%
United States 18.52% 18.69% 22.26%
Rural Population, Total by Race Alone
Report Area White Black or African American Native American / Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander Some Other Race Multiple Race
Franklin County, PA 57,905 871 95 338 7 395 763
Pennsylvania 2,629,898 27,880 3,796 12,615 567 12,555 23,781
United States 52,457,879 3,533,008 1,043,048 399,200 40,683 1,242,870 1,008,112
Rural Population, Percent by Race Alone
Report Area White Black or African American Native American / Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian / Pacific Islander Some Other Race Multiple Race
Franklin County, PA 42.06% 18.53% 31.46% 25.80% 24.14% 13.86% 27.71%
Pennsylvania 25.27% 2.02% 14.14% 3.61% 15.52% 4.17% 10.00%
United States 23.17% 8.97% 35.33% 2.72% 7.53% 6.41% 11.04%
Website Updated August 2016

Urban and Rural Population

Data Background

The U.S. Census counts every resident in the United States. It is mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution and takes place every 10 years. The census collects information about the age, sex, race, and ethnicity of every person in the United States. The data collected by the decennial census determine the number of seats each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives and is also used to distribute billions in federal funds to local communities. For more information about this source, refer to the United States Census 2010 website.

Methodology

Data are from the US 2010 Decennial Census, which provides urban and rural attributes for all geographic areas. by the 2010 Census definition, urban areas are comprised of a densely settled core of census tracts and/or census blocks that meet minimum population density requirements and/or land use requirements. The Census Bureau identifies two types of urban areas:
Urbanized Areas (UAs) of 50,000 or more people; Urban Clusters (UCs) of at least 2,500 and less than 50,000 people.
To qualify as an urban area, the territory identified according to criteria must encompass at least 2,500 people, at least 1,500 of which reside outside institutional group quarters. Areas adjacent to urban areas and cores are also designated as urban when they are non-residential, but contain urban land uses, or when they contain low population, but link outlying densely settled territory with the densely settled core. "Rural" areas consist of all territory, population, and housing units located outside UAs and UCs. Geographic entities, such as metropolitan areas, counties, minor civil divisions, places, and census tracts, often contain both urban and rural territory, population, and housing units. Indicator data tables display the percentage of population in areas designated either urban or rural based on the following formula:
Percentage = [Urban and Rural Population] / [Total Population] * 100

For more information, please visit the US Census Bureau's 2010 Urban and Rural Classification web page.

Notes

Race and Ethnicity
Race and ethnicity (Hispanic origin) are collected as two separate categories in the US Decennial Census based on methods established by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) in 1997. Indicator race and ethnicity statistics are generated from self-identified survey responses. Using the OMB standard, the available race categories in the 2010 Census are: White, Black, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Asian, and Other. An ACS survey respondent may identify as one race alone, or may choose multiple races. Respondents selecting multiple categories are racially identified as “Two or More Races”. The minimum ethnicity categories are: Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino. Respondents may only choose one ethnicity.

Courtesy: Community Commons, <www.communitycommons.org>, August 2016